Green Tea


Positioned as the most deserving successor of "Water", the Green Tea (Camellia Sinesis) is the second popular drink in the world. Gaining immense popularity in the present times, it has become the subject of interest not only for scientists but also the people who remain concerned about their health or just have an interest for the tea culture.


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Green Tea at Your Tap
Positioned as the most deserving successor of "Water", the Green Tea (Camellia Sinesis) is the second popular drink in the world. Gaining immense popularity in the present times, it has become the subject of interest not only for scientists but also the people who remain concerned about their health or just have an interest for the tea culture. Green tea has an astringent taste, especially if high-concentrated, which pleasantly reminds of grape stone. This original taste is accompanied by original and very delicate strong aroma, which reminds of fresh hay, wild strawberry leaves or citrus leaves. In this domain, the Japanese green tea carries the most rich aroma and distinctively luring taste. Having darker colour than the Chinese one, this variety is very popular across the world, especially in the USA (California and Hawaii).

Another variety, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) Green Tea is produced through using various methods of manufacture. The initial manufacturing methods were developed in China, being later processed in India using Assamese clonal stock. This is reflected in the flavour of the Ceylon green tea, which is different from Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese and Brazilian green teas. The Ceylon Green Tea happens to be very light, with a sparkling bright yellow colour and more delicate, sweet flavour-- indeed a specialty type of rare green tea.
 

History of Green Tea
Several archaeological facts have been found in the favor that green tea has been consumed for almost 5000 years, with China and India being two of the first countries to cultivate it. Studies found that green tea was used as traditional medicine in areas such as India, China, Japan and Thailand to help everything from controlling bleeding, helping heal wounds to regulating body temperature, blood sugar and promoting digestion. The famous Zen priest Eisai's work- Kissa Yojoki (Book of Tea) in 1191, also describes the positive effects of drinking green tea on the five vital organs, especially the heart.

Green tea was first introduced in Japan during the Nara period (710-794), when numerous Japanese Buddhist monks visited China and brought tea seeds back to Japan. The Japanese tea industry is said to have begun in 1191, when the monk Eisai planted tea seeds from China on temple land. The making and serving tea as an art form (sado, the way of tea) was introduced in Japan during the eleventh century. The origins go back to China's Tang dynasty (618-907), when a ritual was performed in Buddhist temples. A brick of tea was ground to a powder, mixed in a kettle with hot water, and ladled into ceramic bowls.

 
Green Tea Grades

The tea leaves for making green tea are grown in the warmer southern regions of Japan, with about half produced in Shizuoka Prefecture. Uji, a district near the ancient city of Kyoto (and the district from which the finest Japanese tea comes from to this day). The Japanese green tea grades can be encompassed as:
  • Bancha: This is made by roasting Aracha from the second or later tea leaf picking (Nibancha, Sanbancha, Yonbancha). Usually is brown with nice aroma.
  • Sencha: Being made from all picking of tea leaves, it carries a dark green colour, but after brewing becomes yellow-green with light astringent and sweet taste.
  • Kabuse-Cha: Cultivated on a special plantation and covered for some time for protecting from straight sun rays, it carries more delicate taste and aroma than Sencha.
  • Gyokuro: In this highest-grade Japanese green tea, the plantations are protected from straight sun rays for longer period.
  • Matcha: This rubbed tea is made by pounding in special stone vessels. Being used in famous Japanese Tea Ceremony, Matcha is also a popular flavor of ice cream and other sweets in Japan.
  • Genmaicha (Brown-rice tea): Bancha (sometimes Sencha) and roasted genmai (brown rice) blend. It is often mixed with a small amount of Matcha to make the colour better.
  • Kabusecha (Covered tea): Kabusecha is sencha tea, the leaves of which have grown in the shade prior to harvest, although not for as long as Gyokuro. It has a more delicate flavor than Sencha.
  • H?jicha (Pan fried tea): A strong roasted green tea.
  • Kukicha (Stalk tea): A tea made from stalks produced by harvesting one bud and three leaves.
  • Tamaryokucha: A tea that has a tangy, berry-like taste, with a long almondy aftertaste and a deep aroma with tones of citrus, grass, and berries.
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